Leadership by Design Writing Post

Leadership in the age of Humanity 2.0 — Start from Self

Being “human” is going to be at the core of leadership in the 21st century

 

A historical perspective, from then to now

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The Industrial Age gave birth to modern corporations. Then, everything needed to look the same, the focus was on efficiency and consistency for mass production. Workers were required to act like machines, focus on efficiency, and each person had a distinct role. The mindset about work was more for making a living, and bringing food to the table.

Today, we have already seen massive technological changes begin to alter the nature of work, but it is just the beginning. Diversity of thinking and doing becomes highly valued in the workplace, as this is recognized as key to fostering greater innovation. I’m reading about and seeing for myself, how people are adopting more considered and value-driven approaches to living, rebalancing the pace and impact of modern work and leisure.

Today, we are learning to lean in more to our emotions, and we are starting to listen better to both our rational and intuitive minds.

Today, we are entering the age of Humanity 2.0.

What then, will future business models be like as we transition into a more restorative and regenerative circular economy? How will leadership and management in the 21st century differ from before? What does it mean to be more “human” at work?

I’m excited to be exploring these questions with the rest of my cohort at CCA in this semester’s courses and beyond.

 
In    The Future of Management Is Teal   , Frederic Laloux wrote about organizations moving forward along an evolutionary spectrum, toward self-management, wholeness, and a deeper sense of purpose. Illustration: Martin O’Neill.

In The Future of Management Is Teal, Frederic Laloux wrote about organizations moving forward along an evolutionary spectrum, toward self-management, wholeness, and a deeper sense of purpose. Illustration: Martin O’Neill.

 

Great leaders empower and enable others

It takes a strong leader to bring a strong team forward, and I have been blessed to have been part of a team with a strong leader. Our director Erin, was great as a person, competent as a practitioner, inspiring as a leader. She led by walking the talk, fostering a culture I greatly appreciated.

There was clear vision for the team, roles and responsibilities were clearly defined and made known across. High expectations were set to do great work, yet it was also a forgiving environment. We were held accountable for our own actions, and at the same time, success was celebrated. Credit was given when it was due, appreciation was expressed and I knew that our culture was one that celebrated our strengths, strengths unique to every individual. Our culture was one where everyone had an equal voice, and it encouraged a healthy exchange of ideas.

It was empowering to be part of such a team, knowing we worked well together to move through challenges. This was the kind of team that pushed boundaries, building an environment for creativity to flourish and innovation to happen.

 
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To be a great leader, first become a great person

Today, as we transition to Humanity 2.0, adopting more considered and value-driven approaches to living, we are bringing back the emphasis on one’s character, on how to “actually be,” rather than how to “appear to be”.

I believe leading with integrity is what’s truly going to make a difference.

It takes consistency, consciousness, and choice to walk the talk.

It is a journey which must first start from self, from within.

 

We but mirror the world. All the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body. If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. This is the divine mystery supreme. A wonderful thing it is and the source of our happiness. We need not wait to see what others do.
— Mahatma Gandhi